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I don't see anything about accessibility on Tilda's website. Have you tested it for accessibility? I definitely think most website builders are pretty poor in web accessibility, and that is a problem. I think it's worth calling out to the vendors and in your reviews. For instance, the simple Web AIM checker found several errors with Tilda's main site. https://wave.webaim.org/report#/tilda.cc

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Thanks, Brian, for that point. I'll look into that and I'll email your point and the AIM report link you shared to the company for their response. One other resource, in case it's useful to someone: Userway has an accessibility widget that you can install on any Tilda site — I'd be interested in whether you see that as a useful resource: https://userway.org/blog/userways-accessibility-widget-installation-guide-for-tilda/

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Thanks, Jeremy.

The problem with overlays and widgets is that they don't fix the actual problems, and don't always work for people using assistive devices. Much better to just simplify and improve the website and use a platform that is by default more accessible.

My default check is to search a product's homepage for "accessible." If they don't have that word on their homepage, nor an accessibility statement, chances are they suck at web accessibility.

https://www.nytimes.com/2022/07/13/technology/ai-web-accessibility.html

https://www.forbes.com/sites/forrester/2021/05/27/whats-wrong-with-quick-fix-products-for-digital-accessibility/?sh=5a18d111681d

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I appreciate that follow-up point, Brian. Thanks for explaining that. I've reached out to the team at Tilda for their response.

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Dec 5, 2020Liked by Jeremy Caplan

Thanks Jeremy, and a comparison between Tilda and, say, Wordpress, would be nice. For example, for building a quick microsite, is Tilda smoother?

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Yes, Trung, I find Tilda to be a bit quicker and smoother than Wordpress, because the system for adding and editing modules is simpler. Wordpress has the advantage of a giant ecosystem, with lots of available plug-ins, etc. And it works well when you have lots of regular content to publish, rather than a more static microsite. But I've found Tilda to be preferable for putting something up quickly with a polished design when you don't necessarily intend to update content on a daily or weekly basis.

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