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I chose the fourth option (Iโ€™m an open book), but in truth Iโ€™m not an open book, I just donโ€™t find that giving away this type of data--the kind thatโ€™s used to feed my behavioral profile for advertising--means much to me. Iโ€™m extraordinarily protective of credentials and financial data.

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I keep reading tips like these, I tend to follow them, and then I hear of some breech or about some class action suit claiming that Google doesn't even follow its own rules. Then comes Edward Snowden who tells us that nothing we do online is "private". When push comes to shove, Big Brother will find out.

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Good stuff as always. Thanks for sharing. Does any have any book recommendations that explores how companies use our data? Iโ€™m interested in some of the ethical questions.

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While I recognize that thereโ€™s much personal data that should be kept private and one should have control over what of their personal data companies are able to access, these tools and others (end to end encryption) allow individuals to engage in insidious behavior without repercussion, thus victimizing children and adults. Criminals that engage in the exchange of child sexual abuse material or those that consume pornography (though not illegal but still very harmful) are aided by these tools. Jeremy--would you consider a post with tech tools for those struggling to conquer a pornography addiction.

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Are you people really this naive? Asking Google to deGoogle itself is like inviting the fox to pretend it's a chicken for "just this once"

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